Rome's most romantic places

Rome has its magnificent museums, its splendid churches, its rich history. It also has romance. Buckets of it. Here is where to find some of the city's most romantic places.

Top of most people's list is the Giardino degli Aranci, or Orange Garden, on the summit of the Aventine hill. It offers a sweeping panorama over the city, with stunning views of St Peter's and the Vittoriano, and is particularly popular at sunset.

The Giancolo, or Janiculum hill, gives an even broader view of the city as well as the Castelli Romani and the Apennines in the far distance. The viewpoint has the majestic backdrop, and water-filled soundtrack, of the Fontanone.

Just below the Fontanone in Trastevere is the Orto Botanico, Rome's botanic gardens. With more than 3,500 types of trees and shrubs, this hillside garden makes a wonderful escape from the bustle of the city.

Raphael frescoes at Villa Farnesina

Across the road from the botanic gardens is Villa Farnesina, one of Rome's true gems. This Reniassance palace features breathtaking frescoes by Raphael whose 500th anniversary takes place in 2020.

Make for the river and you will find two of Rome's most romantic bridges - the music-filled Ponte Sisto and, further downstream, the angel-filled Ponte S. Angelo.

Ponte S. Angelo in Rome

Heading into the centro storico there are the old favourites, the Trevi Fountain and the Spanish Steps, both of which are at their most magical when illuminated by night.

Via Margutta, tucked away between Piazza di Spagna and Piazza del Popolo, is arguably the city's most romantic street. Draped in greenery and home to a multiude of galleries and art studios, there is a secret quality to the street which featured in Roman Holiday and was once the home of Fellini.

Via Margutta

Last but not least is the rather unlikely suggestion of a graveyard: the Non-Catholic Cemetery to be precise. With its otherworldly atmosphere and winding paths, this cemetery contains the graves of many notable cultural figures, including the great Romantic Poets themselves: Keats and Shelley.