Ambrit  1920 x 116
Ambrit  1920 x 116
Ambrit  1920 x 116
Castelli H1 700 x 180

Rome reopens Barberini Mithraeum, an underground jewel

Underground site to open to public twice a month.

Rome's Barberini Mithraeum, a mysterious cavern dating to the third century AD, is to reopen to visitors every second and fourth Saturday of the month, from 13 November.

Discovered by chance in 1936, the small archaeological jewel in the historic centre of Rome is located within the Palazzo Barberini complex, in the basement of the Palazzina Savorgnan di Brazzà.

The mithraeum, which measures about 12 x 6 metres, is one of the best preserved of its kind in Rome and has long been inaccessible to the general public.

The rectangular chamber has a vaulted ceiling and a striking fresco depicting the god Mithras sacrificing the bull, with ten pinakes, or votive boards, shedding light on the Mithraic mysteries.

Mithraism was a Roman mystery religion centred on the god Mithras, the Iranian god of the sun, justice and war in pre-Zoroastrian Iran.

Known as Mithras in the Roman empire during the second and third centuries AD, this deity was honoured as the patron of loyalty to the emperor.

Mithraism declined rapidly after the acceptance of Christianity by Emperor Constantine in the early fourth century.

For information on the site see Rome's Superintendency website and for reservations see the Coopculture website.

General Info

Address Via delle Quattro Fontane, 11, 00187 Roma RM, Italy

View on Map

Rome reopens Barberini Mithraeum, an underground jewel

Via delle Quattro Fontane, 11, 00187 Roma RM, Italy

JCU 724x450
Acorn P H3 - 1920 x 190
Acorn P H3 - 1920 x 190
Acorn P H3 - 1920 x 190
Smiling tech H3 - 320x480
AUR 1400x360