Italy's latest covid Super Green Pass rules: timeline

When and how will Italy’s covid Green Pass and Super Green Pass rules change?

Italy tightens its Super Green Pass rules again from Monday 10 January, expanding the scope of the digital certificate which can only be obtained by those who are vaccinated or have recovered from covid-19.

Italy's Super Green Pass is a "reinforced" version of the "basic" Green Pass which proves the holder has been vaccinated, tested negative or recovered from covid-19.

The Super Green Pass cannot be obtained by a negative covid test result, meaning that it excludes people who are unvaccinated.

Neither version of the pass applies to children under the age of 12 or to people exempt from the vaccination campaign on health grounds.

Already required in cinemas, theatres and stadiums, the Super Green Pass will be expanded further from Monday 10 January after which it will be needed to access:

  • public transport (local, regional and national), planes, trains, buses, trams and subways
  • bars and restaurants (for both indoor and outdoor dining)
  • ski lifts
  • hotels and other accommodation facilities
  • parties after civil and religious ceremonies
  • conventions, conferences, fairs and festivals
  • stadiums, swimming pools, gyms, wellness centres
  • museums, galleries, libraries, archaeological sites and cultural venues
  • theme parks
  • cultural, social and recreational centres
  • betting shops, bingo halls and casinos

The tightening of Italy's two-tiered covid restrictions is part of the government's efforts to boost its vaccination drive and stem a record surge in coronavirus infections.

Also from 10 January the minimum waiting time between the second dose of the covid vaccine and the 'booster' shot will be reduced from five to four months.

From 20 January the basic Green Pass will be needed to access hairdressers and beauticians, while from 1 February it will be required to enter banks, post offices, non-essential shops and shopping malls.

The unvaccinated will still be able to access grocery shops, supermarkets and pharmacies.

The government's latest decree makes the covid vaccine obligatory for the over-50s and university staff, in addition to the existing vaccination mandate for healthcare workers, teachers, police, military and emergency services workers.

Premier Mario Draghi said the aim is to "slow down the growth of the contagion curve and push Italians who still aren’t vaccinated to do so”, adding that the government is "acting in particular on age groups that are most at risk of hospitalisation, to reduce pressure on hospitals and save lives."

From 15 February all public and private workers over 50 will only be able to access their workplace with the Super Green Pass, while the existing basic Green Pass rules stay in effect for workers under 50.

Night clubs remain closed until 31 January and masks must be worn outdoors and in all indoor public places.

The more protective FFP2 masks must be worn in cinemas, theatres, stadiums and on all public transport, until 31 March, when Italy's 'state of emergency' ends.

Under the current quantine rules, the obligation to self-isolate no longer applies to those who come into close contact with a covid-positive person, providing they have had a booster shot, have recovered or have been doubly vaccinated within the last 120 days.

They are required to wear FFP2 masks for 10 days after contact and must undertake a covid test, if they have symptoms, after five days.

For those who have been vaccinated or have recovered from the virus more than four months after coming into contact with a covid-positive person, the quarantine requirement has been reduced from seven to five days, followed by a negative test result.

The isolation time for those who are unvaccinated remains 10 days.


For official information about the covid-19 situation in Italy (in English) see the health ministry website. We will update this article if and when needs be. Photo credit: MikeDotta / Shutterstock.com.