Italy poacher shoots rare ibis that made its nest in Rome

Rare bird had nested on a rooftop in Rome earlier this year.

A Northern Bald Ibis - one of the world's most endangered species of bird - has survived after being shot in a field near Sabaudia, south of Rome.

The female bird, known as Hannibal, made international headlines in April when it made a nest with its partner Smudo on the rooftop terrace of a telecommunications building in the southern outskirts of Rome.

Hannibal and Smudo nested on the rooftop terrace of the Wind Tre building in the Parco De' Medici area of Rome this spring.

News of the shooting was announced by Italy's national board for animal protection ENPA which said that Hannibal was traced thanks to its GPS trasmitter by volunteers from the environmental protection organisation Bentornato Ibis (Welcome Back Ibis).

After being left "seriously wounded" in the field, Hannibal was saved by the Carabinieri department of Circeo National Park "but will probably never fly again", ENPA said.

Describing Hannibal's "broken flight" as "shameful", ENPA called on the government of Mario Draghi to implement "immediate measures against those who commit a crime so hateful."

Hannibal may never fly again after being shot

Also known as the Hermit Ibis, or Waldrapp, (Geronticus eremita), the Northern Bald Ibis species risked dying out completely in recent decades due to poaching, habitat destruction and agricultural pesticides.

Once widespread throughout the Mediterranean basin, the migratory bird disappeared from European skies more than three centuries ago.

Until recently the species was classified as "in danger of extinction" however the birds have begun to make a tentative comeback thanks to the Waldrappteam project, whose goal is to reintroduce the ibis to Europe.