Italy police use water cannon to clear No Green Pass sit-in at Trieste port

Police try to move Trieste dockers protesting against Italy's Green Pass.

A police operation began on Monday morning to clear a sit-in at Trieste port by dockers protesting over Italy's mandatory covid Green Pass certificate.

Police used water cannon on protesters. Photo ANSA.

Police officers, dressed in riot gear, used water cannon and tear gas against hundreds of protesters who refused to leave the protest which began on Friday.

The Trieste sit-in is the most prominent among the sporadic protests in recent days against the Green Pass - a certificate proving the holder has been vaccinated, tested negative or recovered from covid-19 - which on Friday became mandatory for all workers in Italy.

The Trieste port president Zeno D'Agostino said on Saturday night: "Enough of this circus," warning: "This situation can no longer be tolerated, I need a port that works."

The protest continued all day Sunday with Trieste port workers vowing to block 'all of Italy' on 30 October if the Italian government does not withdraw the health certificate obligation for workers.

What are Italy's Green Pass rules in the workplace?

Workers who do not have the Green Pass are not permitted to enter their place of work, with every day they miss as a result regarded as "unjustified" absence.

After five days off work, employees will be suspended and have their pay frozen, however nobody can be fired for not having the health certificate.

Unvaccinated employees can still enter the workplace but only if they undergo a covid test every 48 hours, at their own expense, with a fixed cost of €15.

Those who go to work without the health certificate risk fines of between €600 and €1,500.

About 81 per cent of Italy's vaccinable population (over the age of 12) is fully vaccinated against covid-19.

Details about the Green Pass can be found - in Italian - on the Certificazione Verde website while for official information about the covid-19 situation in Italy - in English - see the health ministry website. 

Photo credit: Fanpage