Rome unearths ancient dog statue and tombs under street

Ancient funerary complex comes to light during Rome street works.

Rome archaeologists have unveiled the remains of a 2,000-year old burial complex discovered during street works in the Appio Latino quarter of the city.

The discovery of the three tombs, which date from between the first century BC and the first century AD, came about as utility firm ACEA prepared to install water pipes on Via Luigi Tosti.

The complex, about half a metre below the current street level, is located along the Via Latina, one of Rome's earliest roads, in an area rich in Roman villas and burial tombs.

Along with the three structures, belonging to a single complex, archaeologists discovered a decorative terracotta figurine of a dog and an intact funerary urn containing bone fragments.

The discovery of the complex - partially compromised by earlier construction works and bearing ancient fire damage - sheds "new light on a very important context", according to Rome's special superintendent of archaeology, Daniela Porro.

Photos Fabio Caricchia

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Address Via Luigi Tosti, 00179 Roma RM, Italy

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Rome unearths ancient dog statue and tombs under street

Via Luigi Tosti, 00179 Roma RM, Italy