Many memorials dedicated to events during the closing stages of world war two can be found in those parts of Italy occupied by German troops, especially Rome. Recently, on 4 June, the 63rd commemoration was celebrated at Via Cassia Km 14,200 of the execution of 12 Italian partisans, one Pole and one Englishman by German troops retreating from Rome. The memorial plaque was inaugurated by the city council on 4 June 1949 and the annual ceremony begins with the laying of wreaths and banners from partisan and trade union groups, together with civic and provincial tributes. Relatives and representatives from the church, political and military authorities are also present.

In 1944 Villa Wolkonsky (now the residence of the British ambassador) near Piazza S. Giovanni was occupied by the German embassy and the Gestapo prison headquarters had taken over one of the modest 1930s apartment blocks in nearby Via Tasso, part of which is now the historical museum of the liberation of Rome.

On the night of 3 June 1944, as the Allied Fifth Army was approaching Rome from the south along Via Appia and Via Casilina, the German troops were abandoning the city and heading north. The last German vehicle, a Spa 38 truck, left Via Tasso with six SS guards, including two Italian personnel, and 14 political prisoners with their hands tied behind their backs