A pregnant mayor of Rome?

The debate rages (among men of course) about whether a pregnant woman should run as a candidate for mayor of Rome.

Are men simply jealous that they can't be pregnant and run for mayor of the capital? Or are they just so limited in their vision that they should automatically be excluded from presenting themselves as candidates for the job?

What a wonderful idea, that Giorgia Meloni who is several months pregnant, should have the enthusiasm and drive to consider running for mayor of Rome, probably one of the most difficult jobs in Italy right now.

Shame on those male candidates – Guido Bertolaso and Roberto Giachetti among them – who dithered and dithered before declaring their candidacy, without even having the “excuse” of being pregnant. Do we really want them if they are so luke-warm about the job?

Women don't want to be governed by unenthusiastic, unattractive, under-employed, badly dressed, uncharismatic, bossy, dictatorial, know-it-all, patronising men. Women don't usually describe men in public office in such terms (as men do women) but perhaps we should start. Men might take note if we rated them according to their looks or intelligence.

Several decades ago a gallant man brought a bunch of yellow mimosa into our office, then on Via dei Delfini, on 8 March, international women's day. Rather than accept the flowers graciously as he would have expected I remember saying something to the effect that there was no point having a “Women's Day until there was also a Men's Day.” He didn't understand, anymore than most men understand why it is demeaning to write or talk about women artists, women authors, women musicians or women chief executive officers. Either we are all just artists, authors, musicians or CEOs or we should start writing about men artists, men authors, men musicians and men CEOs.

Does anyone have a good date for a Men's Day in mind? And a flower?

I won't be around to see the first pregnant male candidate for the mayor of Rome but if I were I would say just as I do to Giorgia Meloni: “Good on you Giorgia, go for it.”

Mary Wilsey